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Conveyancing in Yate Q & A's

Profile photo of Clarisa McMahon

By

Ask Clarisa a question hl@syntarsus.co.uk

Updated: 13/10/17

The nearest airport to Yate is Bristol Airport. The closest train station to Yate is Yate, about a mile away.

Emersons Green, NHS Treatment Centre is a nearby hospital.

Q.

What are the best rates for conveyancing for a £350k property?

A.

Lack of clarity over this topic catches out many buyers, and can leave them paying far more in fees than they budgeted. Many law firms purport to offer cheap conveyancing quotes, but extra costs will be included in small print which unwary buyers fail to check. Any extra costs found in terms and conditions should be fair. The conveyancing quote ought to define any disbursements to be paid.Our quotes clearly state all legal fees for a standard conveyancing transaction.

Q.

How much time should conveyancing legal work require? The house being transacted is also in the area.

A.

For most property, the time required to sell or purchase property will vary, affected by a broad set of issues, for example, if the property is leasehold. 8 to 12 weeks is the average for many firms, whereas Homeward Legal drive the process forwards, completing within eight weeks.

Q.

When should you instruct a solicitor?

A.

If you choose a firm with 'no move, no fee' protection, the sooner you instruct a firm, the better, as conveyancing involves a number of tasks that may be performed immediately. Promptly instructing a solicitor for your Yate transaction can limit the risk of your transaction falling through.

Q.

Which government authority looks after for overseeing the state of repair of Yate conservation areas?

A.

English Heritage, a government body, have put together information on the condition (poor to good) of conservation areas in addition to the exposure to a worsening of the condition of the area. Conservation areas in

Yate are nominated by South Gloucestershire who administer everything from including things like poorly maintained public spaces, the colours of paint used and what can be demolished.

Q.

Will the Yate lawyer tell me about the cost of council tax for a Band F townhouse before completion?

A.

A conveyancer will contact the South Gloucestershire local council to ascertain the up to date council tax band and rates, which will then be included in the report on title. Up-to-date rates for properties in Yate are published on the South Gloucestershire local authority site. Currently (07 September 2012) rates are as follows:

  • Band A - £1,023.00
  • Band B - £1,193.00
  • Band C - £1,364.00
  • Band D - £1,534.00
  • Band E - £1,875.00
  • Band F - £2,216.00
  • Band G - £2,557.00
  • Band H - £3,068.00

Q.

What type of local authority searches regarding the risk of possible flooding at Gloucestershire will the conveyancing solicitor in Yate do?

A.

A necessary component in the legal process involves your lawyer carrying out conveyancing and environmental searches for information in relation to Yate flood risk.

Q.

What can a Yate property lawyer recommend if the property we are intending to buy is within a conservation area in South Gloucestershire planning authority and has inappropriate doors fitted to it?

A.

South Gloucestershire local authority LLC1 searches carried out by your Yate property lawyer as part of the conveyancing will determine the existence of suitable council approval for changes to the building.

Q.

Will it be necessary to get a chancel search if we plan to buy in the parish of Pucklechurch and Abson?

A.

Your conveyancing lawyer is likely to recommend a chancel search. Chancel repair may be apportioned on owners of a building where parish councils have previously chosen not to do so. It is not safe to rely on the historical behaviour of the parish council alone as a guide.